Wednesday, 15 February 2012

Connotea: Bookmarks matching tag oa.new (50 items)

Connotea: Bookmarks matching tag oa.new (50 items)


Users, narcissism and control – tracking the impact of scholarly publications in the 21 st century

Posted: 15 Feb 2012 06:48 AM PST

 
Users, narcissism and control – tracking the impact of scholarly publications in the 21 st century
www.surffoundation.nl
From the executive summary: "What is the scientific and social impact of my research publications? This question has been of interest to scientists and scholars since the inception of modern science 400 years ago. But it was hard to answer. This may now be changing. Scholarship is transforming into a variety of digital networked forms. These developments have created new possibilities and challenges in the evaluation of the quality of research. This is of interest to research funders assessing the quality of research. It is also relevant to the individual researchers interested in assessing their career development. This report explores the explosion of tracking tools that have accompanied the surge of web based information instruments. Is it possible to monitor ‘real-time’ how new research findings are being read, cited, used and transformed in practical results and applications? And what are the potential risks and disadvantages of the new tracking tools? This report aims to contribute to a better understanding of these developments by providing a detailed assessment of the currently available novel tools and methodologies. A total of 16 quite different tools are assessed....However...for this application [research assessment], they need to adhere to a far stricter protocol of data quality and indicator reliability and validity. Most new tools do not (yet) comply with these more strict quality criteria....The report therefore advises to start a concerted research programme in the dynamics, properties, and potential use of new web based metrics which relates these new measures to the already established indicators of publication impact"

The Hindu : Cities / Chennai : Research papers will be available in public domain

Posted: 14 Feb 2012 11:19 PM PST

 
The Hindu : Cities / Chennai : Research papers will be available in public domain
www.thehindu.com
"2012-13 was declared the year of science by Prime Minister Manmohan Singh last year, and there is a lot of effort being made all over the country to not only intensify the quantity and quality of research but also ensure greater access for all. For instance, IIT-Madras plans to make available its research papers in all disciplines online, in the public domain. The institute already provides e-learning through online web and video courses in engineering, science and humanities streams through NPTEL. The attempt now is to convince faculty members to upload their research papers into the institution's repository, says Mangala Sunder Krishnan, Web Coordinator (NPTEL)....What IIT- Madras plans to do is follow an Open Access policy that would make the access of journals and scientific research public and many other educational organisations plan to follow suite....While institutions such as IIT- Madras subscribe to over 2,000 journals, many colleges under Anna University and University of Madras have access to just about 1,500 journals....Even if you go through consortiums, you have to spend Rs.20 lakh which many smaller R&D organisations cannot afford to, adds P. Ramamoorthy, librarian at Sameer- Centre for Electromagnetics, a government-funded research agency. “The restrictions imposed by many commercial publishers do not allow one to legally share the published output of his result with his colleague. Open access will relive authors of such hassles,” he says...."

Budapest Open Access Initiative: Happy 10th Anniversary!

Posted: 14 Feb 2012 07:18 PM PST

 
Budapest Open Access Initiative: Happy 10th Anniversary!
Gary F. Daught
Omega Alpha | Open Access, (14 Feb 2012)
“On February 14, 2002, the Budapest Open Access Initiative was publicly released online with 16 original signatories, formally giving birth to the Open Access movement. [An excerpt from BOAI:] ‘An old tradition and a new technology have converged to make possible an unprecedented public good. The old tradition is the willingness of scientists and scholars to publish the fruits of their research in scholarly journals without payment, for the sake of inquiry and knowledge. The new technology is the internet. The public good they make possible is the world-wide electronic distribution of the peer-reviewed journal literature and completely free and unrestricted access to it by all scientists, scholars, teachers, students, and other curious minds. Removing access barriers to this literature will accelerate research, enrich education, share the learning of the rich with the poor and the poor with the rich, make this literature as useful as it can be, and lay the foundation for uniting humanity in a common intellectual conversation and quest for knowledge. For various reasons, this kind of free and unrestricted online availability, which we will call open access…’”

Federal Research Public Access Act | Capitol Words

Posted: 14 Feb 2012 12:03 PM PST

 
Federal Research Public Access Act | Capitol Words
capitolwords.org
Capitol Words, a project of the Sunlight Foundation (whose mission is to use cutting-edge technology and ideas to make government transparent and accountable), downloads the Congressional Record for “every day Congress is in session” from the Website of the Government Printing Office. Capitol Words then “visualizes the most frequently used words in the Congressional Record, giving you an at-a-glance view of which issues lawmakers address on a daily, weekly, monthly and yearly basis.” On February 9, 2012 Capitol Words provided a transcript of the speech made by Rep. Doyle as he introduced the Federal Research Public Access Act. The transcript begins as follows: “Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the opportunity this morning to talk to you about bipartisan legislation I've just introduced: the Federal Research Public Access Act. When a federally-funded researcher writes a paper, too often that paper gets locked away behind a ``pay-wall'' and anyone who wants to learn from that federally-funded research has to pay exorbitant subscription or one-time fees...”

Ten Years On, Researchers Embrace Open Access | Open Society Foundations Blog - OSF

Posted: 14 Feb 2012 08:02 AM PST

 
Ten Years On, Researchers Embrace Open Access | Open Society Foundations Blog - OSF
blog.soros.org
"How long does it take for an idea to turn into a movement for change? And how long before that movement achieves its goals? Today, the tenth anniversary of the Budapest Open Access Initiative, seems like a good time to ask these questions....Today, scholarly content and research is freely available online to doctors, patients, professors, and students around the world. Nearly 7,500 academic journals are readily accessible in the Directory of Open Access Journals and more than 2,000 archives are included in the Directory of Open Access Repositories. While much has been achieved to make research freely available, it’s fair to say the BOAI was initially greeted with immense scepticism – even ridicule – by the traditional scholarly publishing sector. Many of my favorite milestones for the movement have to do with the gradual softening of that initial stance, as some traditional publishers have begun to see the value of Open Access to their business. The launch in 2006 of PLoS One, the Open Access “mega-journal,” has been much copied by traditional publishers, and has put its OA publisher, the Public Library of Science, firmly in the black. The purchase of the OA publisher BioMed Central in 2008 by one of the two market leaders in scholarly journal publishing, Springer, further vindicated the OA model....Discussions of Open Access policies will be just one item on the agenda of a gathering of OA leaders, taking place today and tomorrow in Budapest. We plan to develop a set of recommendations which will help guide the movement over the next ten years. We will be exploring issues of sustainability, what we can do to further support OA in developing and transition countries, and what implications OA has for measuring the impact of research, and encouraging its reuse. But just like the first meeting in Budapest, we will be keeping the agenda as open as possible. We want to encourage the creative thinking that led to the conception of Open Access in the first place, thinking that has inspired a global movement which cannot now be claimed by any single institution, but is a testament to the power of a good idea to spread across institutional boundaries and disciplines."

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