Thursday, 29 September 2011

Connotea: Bookmarks matching tag oa.new (50 items)

Connotea: Bookmarks matching tag oa.new (50 items)


Best-Selling Author Gives Away His Work

Posted: 29 Sep 2011 08:21 AM PDT

 
Best-Selling Author Gives Away His Work
www.nytimes.com
"A publishing industry that is being transformed by all things digital could learn some things from Paulo Coelho, the 64-year-old Brazilian novelist. Years ago he upended conventional wisdom in the book business by pirating his own work, making it available online in countries where it was not easily found, using the argument that ideas should be disseminated free. More recently he has proved that authors can successfully build their audiences by reaching out to readers directly through social media. He ignites conversations about his work by discussing it with his fans while he is writing. That philosophy has helped him sell tens of millions of books, most prominently “The Alchemist,” an allegorical novel that has been on the New York Times best-seller list for 194 weeks....[Quoting Coelho:] I saw the first pirated edition of one of my books, so I said I’m going to post it online. There was a difficult moment in Russia; they didn’t have much paper. I put this first copy online and I sold, in the first year, 10,000 copies there. And in the second year it jumped to 100,000 copies. So I said, “It is working.” Then I started putting other books online, knowing that if people read a little bit and they like it, they are going to buy the book. My sales were growing and growing, and one day I was at a high-tech conference, and I made it public....I got this call from [Jane Friedman, CEO of HarperCollins], and I said, “Jane, what do you want me to do?” So she said, let’s do it officially, deliberately. Thanks to her my life in the U.S. changed...."

Academics v Publishers: Revolution in the air?

Posted: 29 Sep 2011 08:13 AM PDT

Google & The Israel Museum Put Dead Sea Scrolls Online

Posted: 29 Sep 2011 06:47 AM PDT

 
Google & The Israel Museum Put Dead Sea Scrolls Online
mashable.com
"Yesterday, if you wanted to get a glimpse of the oldest known biblical manuscripts, your best bet was to travel to Jerusalem. Today, you can search Google. Specialists began photographing the 2,000-year-old Dead Sea Scrolls in 2008 with the intention of making them accessible online. More than three years later, The Israel Museum finally posted digital versions of five scrolls on its website Monday...."

Liebe Fachverlage, passt auf Eure Autoren auf!

Posted: 29 Sep 2011 06:45 AM PDT

 
Liebe Fachverlage, passt auf Eure Autoren auf!
Wenke Richter
Blog der Frankfurter Buchmesse, (28 Sep 2011)

Open access policy adopted - The Daily Princetonian

Posted: 29 Sep 2011 04:39 AM PDT

 
Open access policy adopted - The Daily Princetonian
www.dailyprincetonian.com
"Last Monday, the University formally adopted a new policy of open access for Princeton-produced scholarly publications. This policy will authorize Princeton faculty members to post their published articles on their own websites, an online University repository or other free archives for the general public....The policy passed the Faculty Advisory Committee on Policy with a unanimous vote, and the proposal was approved on Sept. 19 by the general faculty without any changes....While science journals have generally adopted open-access into their business models, humanities publishers have not. In the committee, there was an initial worry that bypassing the scholarly peer-review process that journals facilitate, particularly in the humanities, could hurt the scholarly industry. At the end, however, the committee said they felt that granting the University non-exclusive rights would not harm the publishing system and would, in fact, give the University leverage in contract negotiations....Princeton faculty members can place online whatever version of an article they think is appropriate and compatible with the publication contract. Harvard’s model stipulates that the most recent version before copy-editing be posted. Princeton will be the sixth Ivy League school to adopt an open-access scholarship policy, joining Harvard, Columbia, the University of Pennsylvania, Cornell and Dartmouth. Other institutions with developed open-access policies include MIT, Duke, University of California, Berkeley and the University of Michigan...."

Hydra in Hull

Posted: 28 Sep 2011 07:20 PM PDT

 
Hydra in Hull
hydraproject.org, (24 Sep 2011)
"The Hydra in Hull team is delighted to announce the launch of our new IR head at hydra.hull.ac.uk This new head replaces our old UI based on Muradora...."

Creative Commons Licensing Success Stories: Pratham Books

Posted: 28 Sep 2011 07:13 PM PDT

 
Creative Commons Licensing Success Stories: Pratham Books
Amlan Mohanty
SPICY IP, (21 Sep 2011)
"I will cover in this post, the efforts of Pratham Books, a non-profit children’s book publishing house and their persistent campaigns for openness and unrestricted access to content suitable for children’s books, by advocating the use of Creative Commons licenses, to achieve the twin objective of creating more reading content for children, and at the same time, ensure that it reaches the desired demographic with maximum penetration...."

NZ Government adopts Creative Commons licences | Government In The Lab

Posted: 28 Sep 2011 07:11 PM PDT

Open as in... doors, arms, ended?

Posted: 28 Sep 2011 07:10 PM PDT

 
Open as in... doors, arms, ended?
nogoodreason.typepad.co.uk
"With a fanfare and much waving of pompoms, I [Martin Weller] can announce that the open access version of my book [The Digital Scholar: How Technology is Changing Academic Practice] is now online, via the good people at Bloomsbury Academic. It is available online in plain HTML format, broken down by chapters. I'm excited about this because now I can point people at it and pass it around freely. A couple of people have requested other formats, eg epub, pdf, etc. I could do these, but my feeling is that what's significant is the Creative Commons Non-Commercial licence. If anyone wants to take the HTML version and create an Egyptian hieroglyphics version delivered via 1988 version of HyperCard - well, they can...."

Analysis: Open-access R&D one answer to drug industry woes | Reuters

Posted: 28 Sep 2011 11:28 AM PDT

 
Analysis: Open-access R&D one answer to drug industry woes | Reuters
www.reuters.com
"In a bid to save both time and money, some of the [pharmaceutical] industry's biggest names are experimenting with new ways to pool early-stage research, effectively taking a leaf out of the "open-source" manual that gave the world Linux software. If it takes off, the approach could break the mold of current drug research and speed the development of tomorrow's life-saving medicines for diseases from cancer to autism. At the University of Oxford on Wednesday, two more companies -- Pfizer and Eli Lilly -- signed up for the first phase of the concept by joining existing backers GlaxoSmithKline and Novartis in an unusual public-private research partnership. As supporters of the international Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC), the rivals give cash and scientific resources for work into the three-dimensional structure of proteins -- important for drug discovery -- even though all the findings are made available to scientists worldwide without restriction. In all, the SGC has secured $49 million in new funding. Next year, a far more ambitious scheme is slated to take cooperation to another level by promoting open-access, patent-free research right up to mid-stage "proof of concept" clinical trials, known as Phase II. The bold idea calls for drugmakers to trade exclusivity for the chance to get in on the ground floor of new therapies. After the initial sharing phase, companies could cash in by developing their own versions of any new medicines...."

International Structural Genomics Consortium Announces $48.9 Million in Additional Funding to Continue the Search for New Medicines, Consortium Also Welcomes Two New Member Companies - MarketWatch

Posted: 28 Sep 2011 11:23 AM PDT

 
International Structural Genomics Consortium Announces $48.9 Million in Additional Funding to Continue the Search for New Medicines, Consortium Also Welcomes Two New Member Companies - MarketWatch
www.marketwatch.com
"The international Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) today announced $48.9 million in new funding has been attained. This renewed investment will allow the SGC to further develop its open access research program to support drug discovery and the development of new medicines. The announcement comes as the SGC on June 30 successfully completed its second phase of funding (2007-2011). Formed in 2004, the SGC is supported by public and private sector funding and all of its findings are made available to the global research community without restriction....New members of the consortium are Eli Lilly Canada and Pfizer Inc. The other consortium funders comprise the Canadian Institutes for Health Research, GlaxoSmithKline, the Novartis Research Foundation, the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation, and the Wellcome Trust...."

No comments:

Post a Comment

Post a Comment